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National Debate About Kansas

National Debate About Kansas > Federal Government > Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865)
5 Topic Specific Items
Letter, M. W. Delahay to My Dear Sir
Author: Delahay, Mark W.
Date: December 1, 1860

In response to an inquiry about a presidential appointment, Delahay wrote from Leavenworth that it was too soon to bother the president elect with such matters. When the time came, perhaps in April or May, Delahay believed Lincoln would treat Kansas fairly and might "consult his friends in Kansas and I may be one of them . . . I have been an old friend of Mr. Lincoln and he is a relative of my wife." (This is identified as a "circular letter," so perhaps it was mailed to a number of individuals with similar interests.)

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Patronage, political; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )

Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Author: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1860

Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding the political situation there. Marcus suspected that an organization existed, on the part of Virginia and Maryland, to block the presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, and stated that, if the national situation did not better itself, that he had "no doubt that he [Lincoln] will sacrifice his life" improving it. He added that economic conditions were poor, and that many Congressmen were left unpaid.

Keywords: Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Economic conditions; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Secession; Washington, D.C.

Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Hugh [Ewing]
Author: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 17, 1861

To his brother Hugh Ewing, who was apparently visiting family in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing wrote concerning his upcoming trip to New York and Washington. His major focus was the prospect of Charles Robinson being appointed Commissioner of Indian affairs in the new administration, and his (Ewing's) likely selection to the U.S. Senate if Robinson captured that position.

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Hugh; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.

Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Author: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861

To Congressman, soon to be U.S. senator, John Sherman of Ohio, Ewing wrote to encourage Sherman to support Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. "It is a matter of very great importance to the people of Kansas that a Comr should be apptd who would exert himself to have the numerous reserves in our borders reduced, and such of the Tribes removed southward as wish to get out of our way . . . ." Ewing also mentioned the pending bill for "the admission of Kansas."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Courts; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Native Americans; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pettit, John; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.

Photograph, Abraham Lincoln
Author: No authors specified.
Date: 1850s

A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.

Keywords: Cartes de visite; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Photographs and Illustrations

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